city of Chula Vista

Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Bookmark and Share
File #: 17-0504    Name:
Type: Consent Item Status: Passed
In control: City Council
On agenda: 12/5/2017 Final action: 12/5/2017
Title: RESOLUTION NO. 2017-220 OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF CHULA VISTA ACCEPTING AND ADOPTING THE 2017 SAN DIEGO COUNTY MULTI-JURISDICTIONAL HAZARD MITIGATION PLAN AS IT RELATES TO THE CITY OF CHULA VISTA
Attachments: 1. Attachment 1 - City of Chula Vista Haz Mit Plan 2017 Section 5, 2. Resolution

Title

RESOLUTION NO. 2017-220 OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF CHULA VISTA ACCEPTING AND ADOPTING THE 2017 SAN DIEGO COUNTY MULTI-JURISDICTIONAL HAZARD MITIGATION PLAN AS IT RELATES TO THE CITY OF CHULA VISTA

 

Body

RECOMMENDED ACTION

Recommended Action

Council adopt the resolution.

 

 

Body

SUMMARY

On April 19, 2011, the Chula Vista City Council approved and adopted the 2010 San Diego County Multi-Jurisdictional Hazard Mitigation Plan (MJHMP). The San Diego County Operational Area (OA) was one of the first in the State to develop a plan on a region-wide basis. This Plan was approved by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the State of California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services (Cal OES) in October of 2010. Per Federal and State guidelines, jurisdictions are required to update the plan every five years. In 2014, the County of San Diego and the jurisdictions within the county began revising the MJHMP. Staff recommends that Council approve the resolution adopting the MJHMP. This plan adoption is consistent with Council’s leadership in promoting coordinated regional efforts in hazard mitigation.

 

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW

 

Environmental Notice

Environmental Notice

The activity is not a “Project” as defined under Section 15378 of the California Environmental Quality Act State Guidelines; therefore, pursuant to State Guidelines Section 15060(c)(3) no environmental review is required. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the activity qualifies for an Exemption pursuant to Section 15061(b)(3) of the California Environmental Quality Act State Guidelines.

 

Body

Environmental Determination

The proposed activity has been reviewed for compliance with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and it has been determined that the activity is not a “Project” as defined under Section 15378 of the state CEQA Guidelines because it will not result in a physical change in the environment; therefore, pursuant to Section 15060(c)(3) of the State CEQA Guidelines, the activity is not subject to the CEQA.  Notwithstanding the foregoing it has also been determined that there is no possibility that the activity may have a significant effect on the environment; therefore, pursuant to Section 15061(b)(3) of the State CEQA Guidelines, the activity is not subject to the CEQA. Thus, no environmental review is required.

 

BOARD/COMMISSION RECOMMENDATION

Not Applicable

 

DISCUSSION

The Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 (the "Act"), signed into law (Public Law 106- 390) on October 30, 2000, requires all jurisdictions to have an approved hazard mitigation plan in place in order to qualify for pre-and-post disaster/hazard mitigation funds. A local mitigation plan is also required for non-emergency assistance provided under the Stafford Act following a Presidential declared disaster, including public assistance restoration of damaged facilities (Categories C through G) and Hazard Mitigation Grant Program funding. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) implemented the Act through Part III Federal Register 44 CFR Parts 201 and 206. The law requires the following related to natural disasters:

 

                     Identification and assessment of risks related to disasters

                     Implementation of adequate measures to reduce losses

                     Ensuring critical services and facilities will continue to function after the disaster

 

Approval of the Multi-Jurisdictional Hazard Mitigation Plan (MJHMP) meets these requirements.

 

The multi-jurisdictional/multi-hazard mitigation planning process began in February 2014. The Hazard Mitigation Working Group (HAZMITWG) is comprised of representatives from all 18 cities, the County and other quasi-government agencies. The HAZMITWG met monthly to discuss and complete various elements of the MJHMP. The County Office of Emergency Services (OES) facilitated the planning process and coordinated the development of the MJHMP with the 18 cities and other jurisdictions within the County to comply with the Act.

 

The MJHMP is a pre-disaster strategic plan that serves as a guideline to lowering the risk and exposure to natural disasters. The planning process for development of the MJHMP consisted of:

                     Organizing resources - establishing a planning team

                     Assessing risks - identifying hazards, profiling hazard events, conducting an inventory of assets, and estimating losses

                     Developing a plan - developing goals and objectives, identifying and prioritizing mitigation measures, preparing strategies, and documenting the mitigation plan; and

                     Implementation strategy - adopting the plan, implementing the action items, and evaluating the results

 

The following hazards, in the following order, were deemed critical for the City of Chula Vista:

                     Wildfire/Structural Fire

                     Geologic (Earthquake, Landslide, Liquefaction)

                     Floods/Dam Inundation

                     Other Manmade Hazards (Airplane Crashes, Hazardous Materials Release/Rail Disaster Spills)

                     Extreme Heat and Drought

 

Planning team members from various City departments identified hazards affecting the City of Chula Vista. After reviewing the City’s current capabilities, specific goals, objectives, and action items were developed to lessen the impact of natural and manmade disasters. The goals, objectives, and action items included in the Plan are designed to:

 

                     Promote existing and future disaster-resistant development

                     Increase public understanding, support and demand for effective hazard mitigation

                     Build and support local capacity and commitment to continuously become less vulnerable to hazards

                     Improve hazard mitigation coordination and communication with federal, state and local governments

                     Reduce the possibility of damage and losses to existing assets, particularly people, critical facilities/infrastructure, and City-owned facilities due to any of the identified hazards

 

In addition to the existing hazards, revisions to 2017 edition of the MJHMP focused on a relatively newer emerging risk facing today’s world, climate change. Climate change could influence the hazards we currently face. For example, climate change could exacerbate and prolong wildfire season, make it less predictable and potentially costlier. Climate change could bring drier years with the number of rainy days decreasing and the dry season becoming longer. However, with warmer global temperatures, more water will be in the climate system, possibly leading to rain events becoming more intense over time. We could see demand for water outstripping supply. Public health could be impacted by heat waves, air pollution, and displacement from wildfires. Energy demand could outstrip energy supply. The MJHMP seeks to determine strategies address these very issues.

 

The City continues to take strides in improving the safety of our city and the MJHMP is an example of the City’s commitment to public safety. This MJHMP has been approved by FEMA and Cal OES, and will be used as the City continues to address and mitigate the ever-changing hazards that pose a threat to our city. Today's action will adopt a resolution to approve the MJHMP, which will allow the City to continue to submit applications for hazard mitigation grants. Ultimately, the Plan improves emergency preparedness, response, recovery and mitigation capabilities for both natural and man-made disasters.

 

DECISION-MAKER CONFLICT

Staff has reviewed the decision contemplated by this action and has determined that it is not site-specific and consequently, the 500-foot rule found in California Code of Regulations Title 2, section 18702.2(a)(11), is not applicable to this decision for purposes of determining a disqualifying real property-related financial conflict of interest under the Political Reform Act (Cal. Gov't Code § 87100, et seq.).

 

Staff is not independently aware, and has not been informed by any Chula Vista City Council member, of any other fact that may constitute a basis for a decision maker conflict of interest in this matter.  

  

LINK TO STRATEGIC GOALS

The City’s Strategic Plan has five major goals: Operational Excellence, Economic Vitality, Healthy Community, Strong and Secure Neighborhoods and a Connected Community. The MJHMP supports the City’s Healthy Community goal by identifying strategies that will help make the community more resilient to local climate change impacts. The MJHMP also supports the City’s Strong and Secure Neighborhoods goal by educating and preparing communities for natural disasters and other emergencies.

 

CURRENT YEAR FISCAL IMPACT

There is no current year fiscal impact associated with this request. The MJHMP is a pre-disaster strategic plan that serves as a guideline to lowering the risk and exposure to hazards in the City. Further, adopting the resolution to approve the MJHMP will allow the City to continue to submit applications for hazard mitigation grants.

 

ONGOING FISCAL IMPACT

There is no ongoing fiscal impact associated with this request.

 

ATTACHMENTS

1.                     Section 5 - Goals, Objectives, and Actions, subsection 5.4 City of Chula Vista of the FEMA approved 2017 San Diego County Multi-Jurisdictional Hazard Mitigation Plan

 

 

Staff Contact: Justin Gipson, Fire Division Chief

                                           Marlon King, Emergency Services Coordinator